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Make Building Projections Great Again

Home | Blog | Make Building Projections Relevant Again

As discussed in our previous blog, Building Projections - Big Doesn't Always Cut It, for projections to stay relevant you have to start to think outside the box and the industry norm. For us, there are 2 directions of travel:

Direction One

Projection mapping is a fantastic creative use of the technology and design if you have the budget. The cost to create the content can be prohibitive to most with content for a 5 minute show starting in the thousands (£) even before you look at the equipment and logistics. More importantly you don’t simply rock up at any location and set up stacks of projectors and safety infrastructure.

Planning and permissions are required to provide a show at this level and a degree of preparation of the surface is required for genuine 3D mapping. Think of this: glass absorbs light, light absorbs light and dark surfaces absorb light.

In the previous blog we mentioned the incredible 3D mapping of Buckingham Palace and Millbank Tower. Every window on the Thames facing side of the Tower had to be covered in white vinyl and later removed to beam the content effectively. In buildings like Buckingham Palace and Glasgow City Chambers which were used for the BBC Radio 1 Big Weekend the white shutters and blinds had to be closed in each window to allow the projection to be seen. Large scale shows like these are incredible entertainment opportunities, playing to a captive audience at events and the content itself is the driver to social sharing as shareable visual communication. My point here is that in the past, the value of the projection was based on the building or location, first to beam onto the Angel of the North grabbed the headlines and the story or image would contain the brand message. These so called firsts are no longer readily at hand and are now done to death.

For projection content to stand out and create the same impact as before, you have to look for new locations where the projection will still be seen especially by an audience who have yet to see the projection campaign.

Direction Two

Projection technology needs to be agile and easy to move into places which are untouched by the traditional larger scale systems. The latest iProjector by Nomadix Media is the world’s only wearable and portable projection system that delivers large scale motion and static projections where no van or traditional projection team can go.

The best place to project messages and creative content is ideally where your target audience are concentrated, so it makes sense to be able to move quickly and be agile with equipment that can reach the audience where they are most responsive. If you look at the cafés and bars in each city throughout Europe they are tucked in back lanes, courtyards and roads you simply can’t access with large scale traditional projection teams. If anyone has been to the Pompidou Centre in Paris you will know how many incredible building surfaces that are surrounded by cafes and bars.

The only way to project onto these surfaces is using hand-held portable technology like iProjector, which is powerful enough to beam up to 100ft images and be seen, plus is light enough for one person to carry and roam freely. You can even take the projection inside venues such as bars and nightclubs where permitted.

If you would like to carry out a guerrilla marketing campaign using projections, we would contact us today.

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